Category: Hospice at a Facility

Articles about hospice services provided at personal care homes, assisted living facilities, memory care, and skilled nursing facilities.

Advocating for your loved one on Hospice Services

Take Charge
When someone you love is extremely sick and needs hospice care, you may feel scared, sad, or angry. You may not know what to do or how to help them. You are not alone. Many people go through this challenging time. As a hospice nurse, I have met many families who have loved ones in hospice. Some of them are continually active and involved in their care. They ask questions, make decisions, and speak up for their needs. Others are more passive and trusting. They let the doctors, nurses, and staff do whatever they think is best. They don’t say much or ask for anything. Who do you think gets better care for their loved ones? The active ones or the passive ones?
Read MoreAdvocating for your loved one on Hospice Services

Optimizing Hospice Respite Care: A Comprehensive Guide for Families

hospice four levels of care
Caring for a loved one who has a terminal illness can be extremely rewarding, but also particularly challenging. You may feel exhausted, overwhelmed, or isolated by the demands of caregiving. You may also feel guilty or anxious about taking a break from your loved one. But you deserve some time to rest, recharge, and take care of yourself. That is why hospice respite care can be a great option for you and your loved one. Hospice respite care is a service that allows you to temporarily place your loved one in a facility, such as a hospital, nursing home, or hospice house, where they can receive professional care and support. You can use this time to do whatever you need or want to do, such as sleeping, working, running errands, visiting friends, or enjoying a hobby. Respite care can last up to five days at a time.
Read MoreOptimizing Hospice Respite Care: A Comprehensive Guide for Families

How to Support a Dementia Patient Who Tries to Escape from a Memory Care Facility

patients escaping
Elopement is when a person with dementia leaves a safe area, like their home or care facility, without supervision. This can be intentional or unintentional, and it's important to address to ensure the safety of the patient. If your loved one is attempting to escape from a memory care facility, there are steps you can take to support both them and the facility.
Read MoreHow to Support a Dementia Patient Who Tries to Escape from a Memory Care Facility

Coping with a Loved One’s Placement in a Nursing Home: Supporting Patients with Dementia

women using a rollator walking down a hallway
Dementia can be extremely hard for families to deal with. You may have been taking care of your loved one at home for a long time. But as the disease gets worse, you may not be able to give them the care they need. You may have to think about placing them in a nursing home. A nursing home is a place where people can get 24-hour care from trained staff. We know that this is an exceedingly difficult and painful decision. You may feel sad, angry, guilty, or scared. You may worry about how your loved one will cope with the change. You may wonder if you are doing the right thing. These are normal and understandable feelings. You are not alone. Many people go through the same situation.
Read MoreCoping with a Loved One’s Placement in a Nursing Home: Supporting Patients with Dementia

Identifying Patients Who May Benefit from Hospice Care: A Visual Observation Guide for Personal Care Facilities

In the realm of healthcare, identifying when a patient may benefit from hospice care is a critical yet often challenging task. For caregivers, including Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) and Medical Technicians (Med Techs), visual observation can be a powerful tool to recognize signs that suggest a hospice referral might be appropriate. This guide is tailored to assist caregivers in personal care facilities in identifying these signs through visual observation methods alone, helping provide compassionate and timely end-of-life care.
Read MoreIdentifying Patients Who May Benefit from Hospice Care: A Visual Observation Guide for Personal Care Facilities

Helping Your Loved One Transition to Memory Care with Compassion

Memory care admission can be a challenging journey, especially when a family member is grappling with dementia. This transition demands not only logistical considerations but also a deep understanding of the emotional and psychological aspects involved. As an experienced hospice nurse, I've encountered numerous families navigating this path, and here's a guide to compassionately help your loved one with dementia transition to a memory care unit.
Read MoreHelping Your Loved One Transition to Memory Care with Compassion

Considering Home Hospice vs. Hospice at a Facility: Making an Informed Decision

Where Do Most Hospice Patients Receive Hospice Care
Deciding on end-of-life care for a loved one is a challenging and emotional process. One major decision to make is whether to opt for home hospice or hospice care at a facility. Both options have their advantages and drawbacks, and understanding the pros and cons can help families make an informed choice. Here, we'll explore the pros and cons for each option and provide key questions that families should ask themselves to aid in their decision-making process.
Read MoreConsidering Home Hospice vs. Hospice at a Facility: Making an Informed Decision

Advocating for Your Terminally Ill Loved One in a Facility

distressed woman
As a family member of a terminally ill loved one receiving care in a facility, you play a vital role in ensuring they receive the best possible care and support during their journey towards a good death. Advocating for your loved one involves understanding their needs, communicating effectively with the facility staff, and staying informed about their care plan. This article aims to provide you with guidance on how to be an effective advocate, asking the right questions, and ensuring your loved one's comfort and well-being.
Read MoreAdvocating for Your Terminally Ill Loved One in a Facility

Eye-Opening Lessons on Trusting Nursing Facilities: Advocating for Comfort in End-of-Life Care

Empty Hospital Bed At A Nursing Facility
As an experienced hospice visiting registered nurse, today offered me profound insights from two interconnected perspectives. The first highlights the blind trust we often place in facility nurses and doctors when caring for our loved ones. The second involves the challenges I encountered while advocating for proper end-of-life care for a patient with Alzheimer's.
Read MoreEye-Opening Lessons on Trusting Nursing Facilities: Advocating for Comfort in End-of-Life Care

Educating Facility Staff on What Matters for Terminally Ill Patients

Educating nursing home staff about hospice care is essential for providing quality end-of-life care. Areas to address include shifting focus to comfort, effective symptom management, psychosocial support, communication skills, and end-of-life planning.
Read MoreEducating Facility Staff on What Matters for Terminally Ill Patients

Clues for terminal restlessness often missed for facility patients

Exhausted Patient From Restlessness
One of the hardest portions of the job of a hospice nurse is to identify when a patient has two weeks of life left to live; this can be especially difficult at facilities going through staffing shortages leading to inconsistent caregivers with little to verbally report on a patient’s change of condition. Since being aware of the velocity of declines is extremely important, let’s cover an area that we in hospice (nurses, families, and caregivers alike) can keep an eye on in terms of identifying terminal restlessness which is often a key indicator for one week or less of life.
Read MoreClues for terminal restlessness often missed for facility patients

Fall Reduction – Reducing Falls in Personal Care Homes and Private Homes

Screen Assess Intervene
Falls among the elderly can have severe consequences, including hip fractures, which can be life-threatening. As an experienced hospice registered nurse case manager, I understand the importance of fall prevention, especially in private homes, personal care homes, and assisted living facilities. This article aims to provide practical tips for reducing falls in these settings by following the nursing process: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation.
Read MoreFall Reduction – Reducing Falls in Personal Care Homes and Private Homes

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